Matt Sussman

The Daily Blurgh: Bros before trolls

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Curiosities, quirks, oddites, and items from around the Bay and beyond

For the love of God, iPad, or printed matter, please read former Guardian culture editor, and current lead editor of science and sci-fi wonderblog io9, Annalee Newitz's eye-opening summary of the 5 ways the Google Book settlement will change the future of reading (one plus: "pulp science fiction will make a comeback in ways you might not expect").

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The Daily Blurgh: Stick a Bjork in it

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Curiosities, quirks, oddites, and items from around the Bay and beyond

So what if the Fader posted this last week? Vallejo royalty E-40's new Bjork-sampling track, the Droop-E produced, "Spend the Night" is too fabulous not to share (and it looks like the NY Times likes it too). The icing on the cake is that Bjork cleared the samples, taken from "Oceanea" off of her, IMHO severely underrated, acapella album Medulla. And as Fader commenter bollocks noted, this isn't the first time Queen B has appeared on a local hip-hop track. The timpani-heavy riff from "Human Behavior" was used back in 2003, "by Bay Area legends Hieroglyphics, for 'Let It Roll,' off their classic album Full Circle." Thanks for the knowledge.

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The Daily Blurgh: The true price of free food tattoos

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Curiosities, quirks, oddites, and items from around the Bay and beyond

A. E. Housman (who once deliciously referred to poetry as a "morbid secretion") said, "Perfect understanding will sometimes almost extinguish pleasure. " And as John McWhorter so ably demonstrates, Sarah Palin's words -- or at least the art of parsing them -- can be extremely pleasurable:
 
"This reminds me of toddlers who speak from inside their own experience in a related way: they will come up to you and comment about something said by a neighbor you’ve never met, or recount to you the plot of an episode of a TV show they have no way of knowing you’ve ever heard of. Palin strings her words together as if she were doing it for herself — meanings float by, and she translates them into syntax in whatever way works, regardless of how other people making public statements do it."

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The Daily Blurgh: Howdy, gaybor!

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Tuesdays will occasionally be given over to a guest columnist. This week, please welcome a bitter queen.

Have you heard? Gayboorhoods are becoming extinct. So sayeth Matt Katz tosday in Obit mag, a self identified straight man who has spent enough time among that mythic fairy land, "where gay people lived and hung out, somehow fulfilling stereotypes while simultaneously stimulating social justice" (via hand jobs?) to tell us of the local color that once flourished there and to lament their passing.

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The Daily Blurgh: But will it blend?

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Curiosities, quirks, oddites, and items from around the Bay and beyond

Last Wednesday (forgive our slowness) the New Yorker offered a tantalizing sneak peak at Andrew Pilara's soon-to-be-not-so-private collection of more than 2000 photographic works, a rotating selection of which will be displayed at Pier 24. Not only is the speed at which Pilara -- the president and senior portfolio manager of the RS Value Group and a member of SFMOMA's Board of Trustees – has amassed his staggering collection astounding (six years!), but the quality and breadth of his holdings would send any photography curator worth their salt into apoplectic fits. In addition to name-dropping Jackie Nickerson, Vera Lutter, Hiroshi Sugimoto, Marilyn Minter, and Dorothea Lange, the New Yorker also mentions that Pilara owns all fifty-two of Lee Friedlander’s “Little Screens” (which SF's Fraenkel Gallery last displayed in 2001) and all of Garry Winogrand's “The Animals.” In the words of Rachel Zoe, "I die."

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The Daily Blurgh: Splinters of the cross

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Curiosities, quirks, oddites, and items from around the Bay and beyond

"An unbelievably hermetically sealed spherical inalienable maze of light and sound seeing imagery expand in every direction.”

I was reminded of the words of visionary architect and late SF resident Achilles Rizzoli – who spent his life drafting gorgeous symbolic portraits of friends, family, and loved ones as fantastic buildings, the cornerstones of which would never be laid – when I saw this Wired video that Boing Boing posted about Rohnert Park artist Scott Weaver's enormous sculpture of San Francisco done entirely in toothpicks.

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The Daily Blurgh: San Fran pranksters

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Curiosities, quirks, oddites, and items from around the Bay

As Laughing Squid wisely reminds us, today is Internet Annoyance Day. So, rather than annoy you with fake news items that SURPRISE! Link to NSFWLOLfunnytimes, here's a compedium of some of my favorite moments in which our city has played the fool at the hands of some trickster, egghead-with-a-funny bone, practical joker, anonymous collective, or plain 'ol sick fuck.

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The Daily Blurgh: Bee warned, Purple Sylvester

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Curiosities, quirks, oddites, and items from around the Bay

I'm all for local businesses and delicious honey and getting to use the word "apiarist" in a sentence, but if any kind of this shit goes down you'll know which type of urban farmer to give the stink eye. You say 15 beehives hidden in "'borrowed spaces' around SF," NY Times -- I say bio-terrorist cells. Hell, if you can train bees to detect bombs, who's to say they also couldn't be trained to detonate them?

Meanwhile in Science: "While dominant hyenas have a steady, confident-sounding giggle, subordinate ones produce a more variable call, allowing the animals to keep track of their social hierarchy, according to a new University of California, Berkeley, study." Who's laughing now, bitch?

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Rainbow flex

Jack Cardiff's amazing Technicolor dreams

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arts@sfbg.com

FILM The tagline "in glorious Technicolor" was never done more justice than when cinematographer Jack Cardiff was behind the camera. Whether summoning vertiginous Himalayan vistas, making a pair of scarlet ballet shoes outshine Dorothy's ruby slippers, or accentuating a female star's sensuality while also capturing her intelligence, Cardiff's mastery of light and his bold, at times hallucinatory, use of super-saturated color put him in a class above in a field already filled with so many greats.Read more »

Ghost ship

SFIAAFF's experimental short Scrap Vessel plumbs the depths of the unknown

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