Residents vs. tourists - Page 3

How many rent-controlled apartments is Airbnb taking off SF's housing market?

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Customers who only use Airbnb once or twice will skew those averages way down. Yet the study then compares that number to the "average market-rate apartment rent in San Francisco, which was $2,498 per month in mid-2013. The average income generated is insufficient to cover monthly rental expenses in full."

Which tells us nothing about how Airbnb is impacting either rent-controlled housing or the median income San Franciscans who rely on it. According to the US Census Bureau, the median rent in San Francisco was $1,463 in 2012 and 64 percent of San Franciscans rent their homes.

"The study is bullshit," Tobener said. "They could pull data and tell us how many people are renting full units on Airbnb, but they don't."

Yet the company claims that it is concerned about these issues and working with the city.

"We believe our community of hosts should pay applicable taxes and we are eager to discuss how this might be made possible. We've reached out to officials in San Francisco and we continue to have productive discussions with city leaders," Airbnb told the Guardian. "These issues aren't always easy, but if we work together, we can craft fair, responsible, clear rules that ensure San Francisco continues to benefit from home-sharing."

Yet neither Airbnb nor its political supporters seem to want to have this public discussion. The company has stopped responding to our inquiries, again, and when we asked the Mayor's Office about Airbnb's impacts to the affordable housing market, we got this response and a refusal to directly answer either the original or follow-up questions: "The Mayor has prioritized preserving, stabilizing and growing the City's housing stock. His policy priorities include protecting residents from eviction and displacement, including Ellis Act reform and stabilizing and protecting at-risk rent-controlled units, through rehabilitation loans and a new program to permanently stabilize rent conditions in at-risk units."

Yet Airbnb continues to have an impact on those "at-risk rent-controlled units" that few people seem to want to discuss.

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