Mann up - Page 2

PFA lures Anthony Mann's crime noirs out of the shadows

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'He Walked By Night' (1949)

O'Keefe returned on the other side of the law for the following year's Raw Deal, playing an escaped con determined to avenge himself on the crime boss (future Ironside Raymond Burr) who betrayed him. He travels with two women, one adoring (Claire Trevor), one unwilling (Marsha Hunt) ... at least at first she is. This is the rare noir narrated by a moll, as Trevor's faithful doormat comes to terms with losing the man she's always loved to the "nice girl" he's taken hostage. There's a bitter romantic fatalism to her perspective that's as masochistic as it is hard-boiled.

The PFA offers two features from 1949. Even more "documentary" in its procedural focus than T-Men, He Walked by Night (officially credited to Alfred Werker, though Mann directed most of it) "stars" the LAPD as its personnel hunt a sociopath clever enough to disguise his tracks as he goes on a murder spree. Focusing on the minutiae of investigative procedure ("Police work is not all glamour and excitement and glory!" our narrator gushes), yet full of visual atmosphere, it was widely considered the uncredited inspiration for the subsequent radio and TV serial Dragnet. (Jack Webb even plays a forensics expert.) The then-inventive location work culminates in a deadly chase through LA storm drain tunnels. Border Incident, unavailable for preview, anticipated the Native American rights-centered Devil's Doorway (1950) in its forward-thinking treatment of racial minorities — here Mexicans caught between smugglers, bandits, and US immigration agents. It was originally entitled Wetbacks, a moniker that would have ensured lasting notoriety, albeit at the cost of obscuring the film's anti-discriminatory theme.

Director and DP soon parted ways, alas. Their third 1949 collaboration (the next year's Doorway would be their last) is not in the PFA retrospective, although it ought to be: Reign of Terror, aka The Black Book, is set during the French Revolution, yet it's as thoroughly, baroquely noir as any movie involving powdered wigs could possibly manage. *

AGAINST THE LAW: THE CRIME FILMS OF ANTHONY MANN

Feb. 7-28, $5.50-$9.50

Pacific Film Archive

2575 Bancroft, Berk.

bampfa.berkeley.edu

 

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